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How to get your Halloween Freak-On in Jackson Hole

Posted on Oct 28, 2014

(a portion of this piece was published by Planet JH Weekly)

pumpkinSure, the kids are excited, but who’s ready for adult Halloween madness? Let your alter ego take hold on one of the few nights of the year when the band is not necessarily the only stage show.

Members from two of my favorite locals bands—Sneaky Pete & the Secret Weapons and Elk Attack (disbanded)—have made a creepy one-off project for the occasion, dubbed Sneak Attack. From the Attack, Dusty Nichols will rips lead guitar alongside frontman vocalist/guitarist (and lead Ghostbuster) Bo Elledge. From the Secret Weapons, Sam Lowenthal thumps the bass while Galen Karnatz will be gluing it all together with synth, organ, and creepy harpsichords. Guest Corey Adelman will bang the drums along with Kate Sullivan helping out on vocals. A big set of Halloween classics are in the setlist (“Monster Mash,” “Thriller,” and “Werewolves of London”) while you compete for the costume contest and try to catch Budweiser swag being thrown from stage. Sneak Attack, 10 p.m. Friday at Town Square Tavern. $5. 733-3886.

Slow Magic

Slow Magic

One guy, one mask, and it’s not Buckethead. It’s creepier. Slow Magic’s brand of electronic music is manufactured from a single drum and digital triggers, said to be deconstructionist house and futuristic, or according to his booking agency, “it’s joyous, escapist, multi-disciplinary art that mixes transcendent performance with the nostalgic intimacy of two teenagers staying up too late on the phone.” I recommend you focus on the details of your own mask rather than figure out what your imaginary friend Slow Magic is all about. Just know that it’ll be heavy, glitzy and fist-pumping dance friendly. OPENER: Jackson’s own electro-acoustic duo, Head to Head, dove into the local scene just a few months ago with two drum kits, a laptop and a sampler. Avid percussionists, multi-instrumentalists and production gadgeteers, Otto Wieters and Dan Sanford will open the show with their own blend of hip-hop, EDM, funk and ambient. Slow Magic with Head to Head, 9 p.m. at Pink Garter Theatre. $20. PinkGarterTheatre.com, 733-3886.

Chanman Roots Band

Chanman Roots Band

What has become a yearly tradition at the Silver Dollar, local reggae ensemble Chanman Roots Band will provide a reggae Halloween soundtrack for

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Horse Feathers brings chamber folk

Posted on Oct 28, 2014

(a portion of this piece was published by Planet JH Weekly)

HorseFeathersNot the 1932 Marx Brothers comedy film of the same name, but the prolific indie-folk ensemble Horse Feathers is coming to town, again. Delicate, chamber-folk instrumentation is matched with a hushed, sweet-yet-grim voice led by singer-songwriter Justin Ringle. On a whim, I saw Horse Feathers at SXSW in 2010 and it opened my mind to string-arranged, delicate folk.

The Portland band’s fifth album, So It Is With Us, dropped last week and sounds immediately more upbeat and joyful than previous listening experiences. The album was recorded in a barn in rural Oregon, decidedly influenced by Pentangle, Talk Talk, Paul Simon, The Band, Van Morrison, John Wesley Harding-era Bob Dylan, Desire-era Bob Dylan, and Abner Jay. A conscious effort to make

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Paul McCartney Concert Review: Bridgestone Arena, Nashville Oct.16, 2015

Posted on Oct 27, 2014

McCartneyNashville_2At 72, McCartney appeared ageless at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville on Oct. 16. Really fun setlist here, all 2hrs+45min of it. The light show was psychedelic and the LED light mapping was mind blowing, especially during opener “Magical Mystery Tour” and “Helter Skelter” (which ripped!). McCartney’s vocal range may have shrunk slightly, but tonally, he’s on point and through 39 songs didn’t flub one word that I noticed. He mixed it up a lot, from acoustic solo acoustic guitar to bass, piano, and electric guitar, and his band followed suit. Stories of Hendrix, Harrison, Clapton and Lennon were timeless and the obscure tunes (“I’ve Just Seen a Face,” “All Together Now”) were a surprise. What a treasure. Thanks to Paul for the “Blackbird,” and thanks to my brother for the ticket!

SETLIST1

SETLIST2

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Shady Rill: expanding the folk language

Posted on Oct 14, 2014

(this piece was published by Planet JH Weekly)

ShadyRill1It’s the low water time of year when a rill, or brook, percolates though a canyon or babbles along the valley floor, emptying the high elevation snowpack before the onslaught of winter. Fittingly then, that Vermont’s accomplished folk duo Shady Rill will trickle into town for an intimate show at Dornan’s.

Patti Casey (vocals, guitar, flute, seated clogging) and Tom MacKenzie (vocals, banjo, ukulele, hammered dulcimer, keys) will journey west via the central Vermont town of Adamant for a six-show tour that turns around in Moose. Casey and MacKenzie have played Dornan’s a few times in

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Alex and the XO’s

Posted on Oct 14, 2014

(this piece was published by Planet JH Weekly)

Alex_XOsIndie-pop and alternative quintet Alex and the XO’s formed at Illinois State University in 2011. Backed by Ryan Ristucci (guitar, vocals), Trenton Perry (mandolin), Storm Angone (bass), and Joe Brandenburger (drums), front woman Alexandra Fisher (lead vocals, ukulele, guitar) brings an articulated, Alanis Morissette vocal delivery of jangly pop melodies and at times, rock n roll energy. Venturing west for what looks like their first tour in the area, the XO’s have a spectrum of haunting to catchy tunes for their Jackson debut. Alex and the XO’s, 10 p.m. Tuesday at Pinky G’s. Free. 733-1500.

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Sub Pop songstress Sera Cahoone in Pinedale

Posted on Oct 8, 2014

(this piece was published by Planet JH Weekly)
sera cahooneOriginally a drummer that had been writing songs on guitar since high school, thirty-nine year-old Sera Cahoone is an anomaly in the singer-songwriter world. The Sub Pop artist migrated from Colorado to Seattle in 1998 to open a snowboard/skateboard shop, though quickly transitioned into the music scene. She played drums with several bands including Carrisa’s Weird, singer-songwriter Patrick Park, and on Band of Horses’ seminal debut, Everything All the Time. Cahoone released her solo, self-titled debut in 2006 followed by her Sub Pop debut, 2008′s Only As The Day Is Long.

Cahoone’s sound falls closest to indie-folk with ample breathing room and a patient, broad stroke approach to song delivery. Her introspective, emotionally-open lyrics are important modes of expression for the self-admitted introvert. Words are her transport. There’s a sweetness to her laidback, melodious approach in which the vocal itself contains all of the surprise. It’s through this instrument, her voice, that she maintains a stout

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When the fishin’ is good, the livin’ is easy

Posted on Oct 6, 2014

Snake River fine-spotted Cutthroat

Snake River fine-spotted Cutthroat

It’s usually this time of year – when the aspens are a golden hue and the trout bite is aggressive – that reflections of a Wyoming summer are covered in dusting or even several feet of snow. Not this year. A Native American summer will extend into mid-October here in the Hole, and it feels a little like the days of my youth in ole Kentuck. Last year’s bulky winter combined with unusual bouts of rainy weather has made for superb fishing conditions since last March. Thanks to the folks in the local fishing scene that have provided the advice (Tyler at Orvis Jackson Hole) and to these great Jackson Hole Fishing Reports: Boots Allen’s report at Snake River Anglers and JB’s report at Fish the Fly. In my experience, this has been the best year of fishing since moving to JH in 2001. Cheers to trout hunting and music pickin’!

 

 

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Q&A with Wyoming Public Radio’s Grady Kirkpatrick

Posted on Sep 30, 2014

(a portion of this piece was published by Planet JH Weekly)

Grady Kirkpatrick (center) with the 2014 WYOmericana Caravan

Grady Kirkpatrick (center) with the 2014 WYOmericana Caravan

Reflecting the colorful character of the state while keeping a finger on the national pulse, the glue to Wyoming’s music scene is Wyoming Public Radio (WPR). WPR Program Director and Morning Music host Grady Kirkpatrick took the reigns in December of 2007. Kirkpatrick has added a significant boon to the community-minded, artist-driven, non-formulaic regional radio experience. With WPR’s on-air fund drive that began last Saturday, Kirkpatrick discusses station happenings and what’s to come.

Aaron Davis: Morning Music has hosted more live bands and musicians in the studio during last couple of years. Is this a reflection of WPR’s willingness to have more live music, or is there more demand from bands that reach out?

Grady Kirkpatrick: Live music has always been a part of Morning Music and we’ve been fortunate to have more national and regional musicians coming through the area wanting to play on both Morning Music and the Ranch Breakfast Show. We are lucky to have many talented musicians in Wyoming and all over the region. WPR has hosted artists that are playing the Live at Dennison Lodge music series in Dubois. We would love to bring in more national touring musicians that play in Denver, Jackson and Salt Lake, and route through Laramie. We just added eTown to our schedule Saturdays at 1 p.m. It’s a music performance program based in Boulder, CO so there’s an opportunity to collaborate with them to bring in musicians in for live or recorded performance.

AD: What is the benefit of having live, in-studio bands performing as opposed to just spinning their latest album on-air?

GK: Most musicians have good stories to tell about their music or their inspiration behind the music. I think our listeners appreciate hearing “live radio” and in-studio performances along with

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