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Leftover Salmon + Little Feat’s Bill Payne

Posted on Mar 11, 2014

(this piece was published by Planet JH Weekly)

Bill Payne

Bill Payne

Adding a legendary player to an already storied band does one thing—up the ante. It’s not as if Leftover Salmon needed a lineup refresher. They did, after all, take an eight-year hiatus before coming out of the gates again a couple of years ago in brilliant form. Seemingly reborn with 2012’s Aquatic Hitchhiker, the band is pushing the limits once again with fiery improvisations and a revived energy that substantial time away can often generate.

With the addition of Little Feat co-founder Bill Payne tickling the ivory, there will be an added sense of elegance and experience to the stage. The heady mix of feel-good tunes is sure to feel even better. Throughout their notable career, Salmon has played with a number of keyboardists including Pete Sears and Bill McKay, but Payne is a special treat from all angles. To this fan, he’s the ultimate rock keyboardist. A master on B3 organ, piano, or even his synth ingredients within the Feat’s jazz-fusion experimentation such as “Skin It Back”—all timeless and monumental. I can’t wait to see what he does with some of Salmon’s classic Cajun slamgrass.
Leftover Salmon with Bill Payne, 10 p.m. Wednesday at the Knotty Pine in Victor ($25, 208-787-2866), and 9 p.m. Thursday at the Pink Garter Theatre ($25-$28, PinkGarterTheatre.com).

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Stagecoach culture night at the Center / Bill Briggs Interview

Posted on Mar 11, 2014

(this piece was published by Planet JH Weekly)

CoachBand1969The Stagecoach Bar is a place of mountain folklore. It’s the last genuine, non-glorified, dive-y link to Jackson Hole’s watering hole history of cowboys, ski bums and disco dancers. Gather with your neighbors to experience “A Western Winter’s Eve,” featuring all things ‘Coach: the legendary Stagecoach Band will celebrate forty-five straight years by playing country-Western to a devoted following of two-steppers (6 to 7:30 p.m.), JenTen and the Jackson Hole Historical Society & Museum presents the ‘Coach film The Stagecoach Bar: An American Crossroads (7:30 to 8:30 p.m.), and the evening will close with disco on the Center Theater stage with The Spartan of WYOBASS (8:30 to 10:30 p.m.). (BELOW: Check out the Q&A with Stagecoach Band co-founder Bill Briggs about the band’s 40th Anniversary). A Western Winter’s Eve with The Stagecoach Band, The ‘Coach Film: An American Crossroads, and Disco Night, 6 p.m. Friday at the Center for the Arts. $15. JHCenterForTheArts.org.

From Planet JH Weekly Feb. 18, 2009: 40th Anniversary of Coach Band | Q&A with Bill Briggs

It was 1969—the year of Woodstock, the Rolling Stones’ fatal Altamont concert, Johnny Cash’s top ten hit “A Boy Named Sue,” and Led Zeppelin’s debut album. In the town of Jackson, professional touring bands like Sons of the Golden West, Rusty Draper, and Webb Pierce were delivering quality country-western music to the Greenback Room of the

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Interview: Elvin Bishop

Posted on Mar 5, 2014

(a portion of this piece was published by Planet JH Weekly)

Elvin Bishop simply knows how to boogie and have a good time with an audience. The humble, good-souled seventy-one year is one of the most respected guitarists in blues-rock history, and the feel of his music instills exuberance.

A career that’s as long and storied as Elvin Bishop’s is roots worth tapping into. He won a full scholarship to the University of Chicago as a National Merit Scholar to study physics, so Bishop trekked from his Tulsa home to Chicago in 1960. Near the university on Chicago’s south side—ground zero for the urban blues he’d been studying from afar—Bishop met fellow student and harmonica player Paul Butterfield.

“I was amazed to find other white guys into blues,” Bishop said of Butterfield.

Elvin BishopTogether, they explored the blues joints where Muddy Waters, Little Walter, Otis Rush, Magic Sam and Howlin’ Wolf could be found playing in corner bars for a $2 cover charge. The late-night education led to forming the legendary Paul Butterfield Blues Band with second guitarist Mike Bloomfield and Howlin’ Wolf rhythm section of Jerome Arnold (bass) and Sam Lay (drums). Arguably the first true blues-rock group, they came together several months before the Yardbirds and John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. Bishop stayed in the band during a string of classic records including the seminal East-West (1966) before forming the Elvin Bishop Group in 1968, which co-headlined a series of shows at the Fillmore East with The Allman Brothers. According to Bishop, one must have some luck in the music biz, not just solid chops.

“I think there are guys who are as good or better than me that

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Majoring in Break Science

Posted on Mar 5, 2014

(this piece was published by Planet JH Weekly)

BreakScienceWhen half of an electronic-based duo is a drummer, you just know it’s going to have a heavy, bangin’ backbeat. The new album from Break Science, Seven Bridges, is certainly that, though the hip-hop/Glitch-hop flavored album has enough breathing room that doesn’t always push the level to eleven (stream it via SoundCloud.com/Break-Science). The Brooklyn based duo is on Soulive’s Royal Family Records, and is comprised of producer Borahm Lee and producer/drummer Adam Deitch, who has worked similar roles with Lettuce, Pretty Lights, 50 Cent, Redman, and Talib Kweli. Get ready for a hot club night in the Garter. Break Science, 9 p.m. Wednesday at the Pink Garter Theatre. Late Night Radio, and Strat & Mouse open the show. $17-$25. PinkGarterTheatre.com.

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One Ton Pig acoustic

Posted on Mar 5, 2014

(this piece was published by Planet JH Weekly)

One would think that there’s no such thing as trimming the fat when it comes to simmering local band One Ton Pig. A large ensemble with respect to bluegrass bands, the six-piece has a lot to offer outside of its seven-year residence as the Tuesday night house band at the Silver Dollar Bar. Scaling back to unplugged acoustic instruments, this is your chance to hear the band’s original music in all of its glory before they hit the road for a weeklong tour of Colorado. One Ton Pig, 8 p.m. Thursday at Dornan’s in Moose. $12 at Valley Bookstore and Dornan’s. 733-2415.

 

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Get up and Head for the Hills

Posted on Mar 5, 2014

(a portion of this piece was published by Planet JH Weekly)

H4TH-Press_highres_Marc_LeveretteLike most 21st century bluegrass bands these days, Colorado quartet Head for the Hills (HFTH) reaches into indie rock, jazz, world, folk, even hip-hop. But not all indie string bands can take it to the stages that HFTH has reached—Telluride Bluegrass Fest, Wakarusa, High Sierra, and charting in the CMJ Top 200 will do wonders for a grassroots following. That following has grown over several regular stops in Jackson since 2008. This is not your high lonesome sound ala Del McCoury, but a rather twang-and-banjo-free, cleaner palette of grass that Colorado has become known for. Head for the Hills, 9:30 p.m. at Town Square Tavern. $10. 307Live.com, 733-3886.

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Scott H. Biram: a hard act to follow

Posted on Feb 25, 2014

(this portion of piece was published by Planet JH Weekly)

A 21st century bluesman that has lived a daredevil existence, Austinite Scott H. Biram is the “dirty old one-man band” that you want to keep your daughter away from, unless she wants a lesson in gutbucket, grungy blues. With absolutely no filter, Biram’s presence is staged with a stack of amps, a ‘59 hollow body Gibson, a stomp board, and a combination of old vocal microphones wrapped together in a tangled mess of guitar cables.

“My music is the bastard child of punk, blues, country, hillbilly, bluegrass, chain gang, metal, and classic rock,” Biram said.

photo: Sandy Carson

photo: Sandy Carson

While the crazy stories about this guy continue to accrue, his ruckus taking no prisoners, it’s his music that has benefited from living an existence that is distancing him from the wildest of days. But, that doesn’t mean he’s getting soft. In 2003, one month after being hit head-on by an eighteen-wheeler, he took the stage in a wheel chair—I.V. still dangling from his arm. With two broken legs, a broken foot and a broken arm, he unleashed his trademark grunge blues and hillbilly country at Austin’s famed Continental Club. Less than a year later, he took the stage at South by Southwest to showcase right after Kris Kristofferson. He was quoted as growling, “They said that was a hard act to follow…I’m a hard act to follow, motherfuckers!”

“I used to drink a lot more,” Biram told Chicago Tribune. “It’s gotten a little

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Mardi Gras Weekend: Jackson Six, B-Side Players, Screen Door Porch, Uncle Stack & the Attack, Wood Smoke Rising

Posted on Feb 25, 2014

(this piece was published by Planet JH Weekly)

Jackson Six

Jackson Six

Do You Know What it Means to Miss New Orleans?
Get out the outlandish attire and the beads—it’s a slice of NOLAS in the Hole with some Mardi Gras-themed parties this weekend, topped off by the legendary Fat Tuesday. Jackson’s own Dixieland sextet, Jackson Six, hits the nail on the head when it comes to festive music for this unofficial holiday—swinging, stomping, syncopated beats of New Orleans’ traditional jazz. This year, the band will make their rounds to three locales. Jackson Six, 8 p.m. Friday at Haydens Post; 3 to 6 p.m. Saturday at the Trap Bar at Grand Targhee Resort; 7:30 to 11 p.m. FAT Tuesday at the Silver Dollar Bar. All shows are free.

A B-Side Story
A band being together for twenty years is a monumental occasion. For the B-Side Players, it has been a ride that has harvested the cultural goodness of international cross-pollination into polyrhythmic grooving and a worldly musical language. Cuba, Jamaica, Mexico and Brazil all have stamps on a sound that is driven by horn-laced funk, rock, jazz, Cumbia, Salsa, and Boogalo. Nine-members strong and a Knotty Pine staple, this is energy to be harvested on the dancefloor. B-Side Players, 10 p.m. Friday at the Knotty Pine in Victor. $12/advance, $15/day-of-show. 208-787-2866.

HaydensPost3.1.14SDP & the Town Downhill
Screen Door Porch has had pen to paper over the last few months, writing material for a new album before hitting the road with the WYOmericana Caravan Tour in May and June, followed by a string of regional summer festivals. Haydens Post has become a new hang for locals, and from a musicians perspective, the acoustics in the room are some of the best around.

This is also The Town Downhill/Mini Hahnenkamm weekend at Snow King Mountain. Jackson is one of the last places in the country to organize and support a non-sanctioned downhill race. The Jackson Town Downhill features the heart-throbbing Mini-Hahnenkamm course on Snow King with divisions for Pro, Recreation, Telemark, Junior, Fat and Baggy and Snowboard.  Screen Door Porch (quartet), 9 to 11 p.m. Saturday at Haydens Post. Free. 732-5200

Disco Party Attack
UncleStackDiscoPosterTown Square Tavern’s Tuesday house band, Uncle Stack & the Attack, will add to the Friday ruckus by stepping out of their normal shoes to offer a disco inferno dubbed “Stayin’ Alive in Jackson Hole.” The show will feature

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